Author: Lynn Wandia

Ethereum Co-Founder Says Crypto Growth In Near its ‘Ceiling’

Ethereum Co-Founder Says Crypto Growth In Near its ‘Ceiling’

Business, Technology
The days of explosive growth in the blockchain industry have likely come and gone now the average person is aware of its existence, according to Vitalik Buterin, co-founder of Ethereum. “The blockchain space is getting to the point where there’s a ceiling in sight,” Buterin said in a Sept. 8 interview with Bloomberg at the Ethereum Industry Summit conference in Hong Kong. “If you talk to the average educated person at this point, they probably have heard of blockchain at least once. There isn’t an opportunity for yet another 1,000-times growth in anything in the space anymore.” Vitalik Buterin Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg Growth in Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies in the blockchain community through its first six or seven years was dependent on mark
Twitter is tests personalized ‘unfollow’, may now suggest accounts to flag off

Twitter is tests personalized ‘unfollow’, may now suggest accounts to flag off

social media, Technology
Twitter tested a feature that suggests users to unfollow, as first spotted by TheNextWeb’s Matt Navarra earlier today. The test lasted for only a few days, and it has since concluded. Twitter is now suggesting accounts to UNFOLLOW! h/t @medavep who got told to unfollow me! pic.twitter.com/PNaY7aQ9i0 — Matt Navarra (@MattNavarra) August 29, 2018 “We know that people want a relevant Twitter timeline. One way to do this is by unfollowing people they don’t engage with regularly,” reads a Twitter statement given to The Verge. “We ran an incredibly limited test to surface accounts that people were not engaging with to check if they’d like to unfollow them.” For years, Twitter has recommended "Who to Follow," but the company is also testing the reverse. That's right, some users are
Twitter officially kills third-party app features

Twitter officially kills third-party app features

Business, Internet, social media
Micro-blogging company Twitter has removed support for a number of third-party applications and outdated developer tools. The company said in a blog post it chose to stop supporting a number of third-party applications to focus on improving Twitter for iOS, Android, and its web platform. The company also dropped support for Twitter on Apple Watch and Twitter for Mac, and has replaced its Twitter for Windows App with its new web application. In response third-party applications such as Tweetbot has already removed certain functionality to mitigate the effect of these changes, crippling many of its features. “We feel the best Twitter experience we can provide today is through our owned and operated Twitter for iOS and Android apps, as well as desktop and mobile twitter.com,” said Twit
Social media bots an influential force in Africa’s elections

Social media bots an influential force in Africa’s elections

Internet, Mobile, social media
Automated bots are increasingly muddying election cycles in Africa, disrupting conversations, distorting facts, and bringing into focus the changing dynamics of politics in the continent. Bots on social media became an influential voice during crucial Africa polls over the last year, claims a report called How Africa Tweets from communications consultancy Portland. These bots, defined by some as a new form of media, are software programs that combine artificial intelligence with communication skills and intimate human behavior. Using them, one could amplify a specific conversation on social media outlets like Twitter and Facebook by posting videos, photos, and biased statements targeting particular hashtags and wordings. In 10 elections across nine African nations which took place be...
Bloodless malaria test by young Ugandan inventor wins Africa’s top engineering prize

Bloodless malaria test by young Ugandan inventor wins Africa’s top engineering prize

Technology
The $33,000 Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation has been awarded to a 24-year old Ugandan engineer for his invention of a bloodless malaria test. Before now, small blood samples taken from suspected patients in hospitals or pharmacies were used to test for malaria but with Matibabu, the device developed by Brian Gitta and his team, there is no need for pricking. When a person is infected, the malaria parasite takes over a vacuole of the red blood cells and significantly remodels it. For Matibabu to work, it is clipped onto a person’s finger and using light and magnetism, a red beam of light scans the finger for changes in colour, shape and concentration of the red blood cells. A result is produced within a minute and sent to a mobile phone linked to the device. Matibabu (Swah