Cyber Security

Online safety Can Become the ‘Immune System’ of Digital Transformation in organizations

Online safety Can Become the ‘Immune System’ of Digital Transformation in organizations

Cyber Security
The sophistication and scope of cyber threats are expected to further escalate as the internet of things develops, yet our defenses remain low. Overwhelmingly, the current strategy is to define the threats, and then build strong defensive walls focused on keeping nefarious agents, viruses or programs out. This means that the similarity between cyber and biological warfare is tough to ignore: in both cases, we deal with evolving adversaries that grow in complexity and gradually vary their means of attack. Currently, digital technologies like the Internet of Things will add $14 trillion to the world's 20 largest economies by 2030. That's one fifth of the current world GDP. However, a major gap has been created between innovations and security. Striking a balance between this two is what wi
Kenya worst hit in East Africa by cyber crime

Kenya worst hit in East Africa by cyber crime

Cyber Security
Cyber crime has been dubbed “burglary for the 21st Century”  around the globe. But the scale of the crimes which can now be committed means millions of finances can now be stolen at the touch of a button. In East Africa, Kenya recorded the highest losses, $171 million, to cyber criminals. Banks have become the leading target of cybercrime as people increasingly adopt the use of financial technology. According to Serianu’s Cybersecurity Report 2016, African countries lost at least $2 billion in cyberattacks in 2016. Tanzania lost $85 million while Ugandan companies lost $35 million. Over one-third of organisations that experienced a breach in 2016 reported substantial customer, opportunity and revenue loss of more than 20 percent, this according to Cisco 2017 Annual Cybersecurity Report.
Wireless Headphones Could Be Spying on You

Wireless Headphones Could Be Spying on You

Cyber Security
Malicious cybercriminals aren’t the only ones who want access to your company data. There’s another threat lurking right around the corner: companies. Some of the tech devices from different companies you own could be spying on you and tracking every move you make. Audio giant Bose has been spying on customers who use its wireless headphones by using an app that tracks the music, podcasts and other audio they listen to, a lawsuit charged. Bose, in turn, has been violating customers’ privacy rights by selling their info without permission, according to the federal suit filed Tuesday in Chicago. The complaint filed by Kyle Zak seeks an injunction to stop Bose’s “wholesale disregard” for the privacy of customers who download its free Bose Connect app from Apple or Google Play stores to the
Kenya ICT Ministry urging massive investment in cyber security

Kenya ICT Ministry urging massive investment in cyber security

Cyber Security
Amid calls for regional harmonisation of cyber-crime laws, the government of Kenya is proceeding with the passage of a bill to address the growing problem of cyber-crime. The Kenya government is set to pass the Computer and Cybercrime Bill into law after its approval by cabinet as east African countries push for regional harmonization of cyber-crime laws. The bill is set to be tabled in parliament for debate and then go to a vote within the next few weeks. After that, it is expected to be signed by the president before the end of the year. According to the Kenya's ICT cabinet secretary, the Computer and Cybercrime Bill 2016 will target illegal access, online fraud, money laundering, phishing, cyber-stalking and child abuse, among other things. Cyber-criminals can only be guarded again...
Hackers Can Steal Your Passwords by Monitoring SmartPhone Sensors

Hackers Can Steal Your Passwords by Monitoring SmartPhone Sensors

Cyber Security, Mobile
An average smartphone these days is packed with a wide array of sensors such as GPS, Camera, microphone, accelerometer, magnetometer, proximity, gyroscope, pedometer, and NFC. According to a team of UK scientists , hackers can potentially guess PINs and passwords – that you enter either on a bank website, app, your lock screen – to a surprising degree of accuracy by monitoring your phone's sensors, like the angle and motion of your phone while you are typing. The danger comes due to the way malicious websites and apps access most of a smartphone's internal sensors without requesting any permission to access them – doesn't matter even if you are accessing a secure website over HTTPS to enter your password.  Smartphone apps usually ask your permissions to grant them access to sensors lik