Internet

BRCK’s Moja goes live in Nairobi,signs up Facebook,Vanu for trials in Rwanda

BRCK’s Moja goes live in Nairobi,signs up Facebook,Vanu for trials in Rwanda

Internet, Technology
BRCK's Moja, a free public WiFi project for smartphone users in Kenya which was announced in March, is now live in several areas  in Nairobi. It has also signed up partners, Facebook and Vanu, for similar trials in rural Rwanda. Vanu Inc is providing low-energy and solar-powered base stations to BRCK in Rwanda. Unlike Rwanda where BRCK is the only firm working on free public WiFi, Surf and Poa Internet are working on similar but ad free models targeted at low-cost communities at a daily, weekly or monthly fee.Free or affordable internet is a great initiative  and BRCK’s Moja has evaded the net neutrality debate by running ads to pay for Internet in Kenya. In Rwanda, Facebook’s Free basics is the main focus and might raise eyebrows. It’s not a big deal though as Airtel runs Fac
Safaricom invests into the home internet market traditionally dominated by Jamii Telecom, Wananchi Group, Telkom Kenya and Liquid Telecom

Safaricom invests into the home internet market traditionally dominated by Jamii Telecom, Wananchi Group, Telkom Kenya and Liquid Telecom

Broadband, Internet
In line with changing lives in Kenya by making homes more fun and great for work and learning, Safaricom is now providing Home Fibre. The Listed telecom operator has introduced four packages, Platinum, Gold, Silver and bronze, for its Internet to homes offering as it makes an aggressive play to grow its market share.  The Safaricom Fibre allows users to have fast, reliable and unlimited internet access from the comfort of their home. After registration, a user will be given a router and access to credentials that will enable them to have both Wireless and LAN access, with no installation charges. In the new strategy, Safaricom will charge Sh2,500 for bandwidth of 5 megabits per second (Mbps) and in the bronze package and Sh9,999 for 40Mbps speeds for platinum customers. The
Kenya marked Literacy Day with focus on digital world

Kenya marked Literacy Day with focus on digital world

Internet
As the world becomes increasingly digital, being to able to access technologies such as the internet and mobile phones comes with a set of new possibilities and challenges when it comes to literacy. According to UNESCO, "literacy is now understood as a means of identification, understanding, interpretation, creation, and communication in an increasingly digital, text-mediated, information-rich and fast-changing world". Kenya Friday joined other UNESCO member States in marking the 51st International Literacy Day (ILD). The Director of Adult and Continuing Education in the Ministry of Education, Irreneous Kinara said the day will be celebrated across the world under the theme of ‘Literacy in a digital world.’ National celebration of the event is being conducted at Isinya Mult
Technological Trends; why Africa has to move quickly

Technological Trends; why Africa has to move quickly

Internet, Mobile
The rapid growth of the African tech sector was mainly due to the expansion of mobile technology and driven entrepreneurs seeking to find answers to some of the main challenges facing the continent. In three key tech ecosystems of Kenya, Nigeria and, to a lesser extent, South Africa, innovation has been fuelled by necessity. GSMA's 2017 report into the mobile economy in Sub-Saharan Africa noted that the number of unique mobile subscribers in Sub-Saharan Africa will grow to 535 million or 50% of the population in 2020 – making it the fastest growing region in the world (in terms of mobile subscriptions) over the five-year period. However, according to recent analysis by IDC, Africa's smartphone revolution is showing signs of a slowdown, with feature phones singled out as being lar
Internet of Things: the next stop on the transformation roadmap.

Internet of Things: the next stop on the transformation roadmap.

Internet
IoT is driving digital transformation. It could soon be as commonplace as electricity in the everyday lives of people in OECD countries. As such, it will play a fundamental role in economic and social development in ways that would have been challenging to predict as recently as two or three decades ago. The incorporation of the IoT into people’s lives will require evaluating implications for their safety and privacy, including the security of their personal information and the development of appropriate safeguards. Appropriate legal privacy and consumer protection frameworks will be fundamental enablers of acceptance and trust. "IoT  has the power to create new revenue streams, cut costs and increase productivity by redesigning operations and simplifying processes” says Thierr