social media

Can you spot fake Amazon reviews

Can you spot fake Amazon reviews

Business, Internet, social media
What's a fake review? Exactly what it sounds like: a review posted by a company employee or anyone else with a vested interest in selling more product. Here's a great example: You're in the market for a GoPro-style action camera. A real GoPro will run you $200 to $400 in the US, but there are countless knock-offs priced as low as $40 to $50. But they can't possibly be as good, right? Well, they look like GoPros. They come with lots of accessories. And here's the kicker: high marks from dozens or even hundreds of reviewers. Sold! According to Fakespot, the dashcam gets an "F." But, wait, it might be perfectly decent product. It's just that a big chunk of the reviews failed to make the grade. Screenshot by Rick Broida/CNET ...
Advertisers have started to question Facebook’s value as scandals increase

Advertisers have started to question Facebook’s value as scandals increase

Business, Internet, social media
Facebook has suffered a near nonstop drip of bad news in 2018, and with each event advertisers have barely uttered a peep while continuing to spend. Recently with yet another revelation about the company's past data practices, one agency chief finally said enough is enough, while other ad agency senior executives say they are questioning how much consumers continue to trust Facebook and whether advertisements on the social network continue to be effective. Mat Baxter, the global CEO of ad agency Initiative, said in a post on LinkedIn that he was advising clients not to advertise on Facebook. "It’s about time we take a collective stand against the egregious behavior of Facebook," Baxter wrote. Baxter, who has head of Initiative oversees media buying and planning for Amazon,
Twitter relaunches the reverse-chronological feed as an option from the ranked timeline for all users

Twitter relaunches the reverse-chronological feed as an option from the ranked timeline for all users

social media, Technology
Twitter is offering users another escape hatch from its ranked timeline. The company said today that it will introduce a prominent new toggle in the app to switch from the ranked timeline to the original, reverse-chronological feed. The company says the move comes in recognition of the fact that Twitter is often most useful in real time, particularly during live events such as sports games or the Oscars. Twitter began ranking the timeline almost four years ago. It was an effort to increase usage at a time when Facebook had pulled dramatically ahead of Twitter, raising doubts about the company’s future and setting it on a course to reinvent itself. Many users griped about the change, even though Twitter has always allowed users to switch back to the reverse-chronological feed
Did another latest Facebook bug leak your photos?

Did another latest Facebook bug leak your photos?

Cyber Security, social media, Technology
An estimated 6.8 million users were affected in the latest photo leak caused by a bug its app development platform that let apps access the private pictures of users, Facebook has revealed. Apps are expected to only have access to images posted on a user’s timeline, however a bug let the apps see any images linked to the account. This includes images on Facebook Stories and Facebook Marketplace, as well as those uploaded but not published. Facebook stores the latter for three days before they are deleted, in case the user decides to publish them. Users are required to give permission for apps to view photos, and only users who gave picture permissions had their images leaked to the apps. Facebook said the bug was active for 12 days between September 13th and September 25th,
You should never recycle passwords

You should never recycle passwords

Cyber Security, Mobile, social media
Using one password for everything is convenient, but it’s also dangerously insecure. We examine the case of Mark, a young designer. Mark is a regular guy. He has e-mail, Facebook, Instagram, Amazon, eBay, Steam, and Battle.net accounts, not to mention ones for another dozen online stores and a forum dedicated to his favorite video game. The accounts are all linked to his e-mail. One day, the customer database of one of the online stores Mark has an account at suffers a leak (apparently it was kept unencrypted on an open-access server). No credit card information is stolen, but e-mail addresses, names, and passwords are. At first glance, there seems no particular reason to worry. Such leaks happen, and this is just a small online store — can you blame a humble shopkeeper