social media

It’s time to break up Facebook opines Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes

It’s time to break up Facebook opines Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes

Business, Cyber Security, Governance, Internet, Mobile, social media
Chris Hughes helped Mark Zuckerberg transform Facebook from a dorm-room project into a real business. Now, he's calling for the company to be broken up.In a lengthy opinion piece published Thursday by the New York Times, Hughes says that Zuckerberg has "unchecked power" and influence "far beyond that of anyone else in the private sector or in government."It's time, he writes, for regulators to break up Facebook (FB). "Mark is a good, kind person. But I'm angry that his focus on growth led him to sacrifice security and civility for clicks," writes Hughes. "I'm disappointed in myself and the early Facebook team for not thinking more about how the News Feed algorithm could change our culture, influence elections and empower nationalist leaders," he continues. "And I'm worried that Mark has su
Chinese Baidu spin-off DO Global Games banned from Google Play Store

Chinese Baidu spin-off DO Global Games banned from Google Play Store

Cyber Security, Mobile, social media
For a long time, the Play Store could be considered the wild west of app distribution, especially compared to Apple's inherently more restrictive App Store. Google is working on improvements though and is becoming more stringent on app permissions, among other things. Still, we're back with another ad fraud scheme right inside the Store, following in the footsteps of last year's Cheetah Mobile investigation. Another Chinese app developer, DO Global, is alleged to have added code in its apps that automatically clicks on ads without users' knowledge. BuzzFeed News first brought these findings to light in collaboration with security researchers Check Point and Method Media Intelligence. They found out that the app developer in question is a spin-off from Chinese giant Baidu who...
Benin Internet taxes would have cut active mobile broadband subscribers by 20%- Study

Benin Internet taxes would have cut active mobile broadband subscribers by 20%- Study

Governance, Internet, social media
In September 2018, the Benin government proposed a tax on over-the-top services. The proposed tax was two-fold: a 5% tax on the pre-tax price for voice, SMS and internet services and a 5 CFA fee per MB for data used to access social media and OTTs. This move was the latest case in a recent trend among governments to impose consumer-related taxes on internet access with the goal of raising revenues and in some cases stifling free speech. A4aI's previous analysis from Uganda showed that a social media tax (a daily fee to use over-the-top (OTT) services such as Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, and Viber) increased costs by as much as 10% for low-income groups. Additional research from CIPESA suggested the tax led to a decrease in the number of people using the internet.   Key find
A false alarm over Twitter likes and retweets buttons ‘removal’ in new update

A false alarm over Twitter likes and retweets buttons ‘removal’ in new update

Mobile, social media
Twitter users may be about to find out what Twitter is like when virtually everything people use it for has been demolished. Then again, we could also be overreacting to a bit of social media-fueled hysteria. Twitter's announcement that it plans to update how people use the site has prompted fears that it is about to hide the number of likes and retweets a post gets.  The confusion began following a misunderstanding by some users that Twitter is planning to remove the engagements entirely from tweets.  Instead, Twitter is only testing putting engagements counts on replies behind a user tap – or click. Twitter attempted to clear up the confusion in a series of tweets responding to confused users. "Hi! We've been rolling out quite a few things this w
Kerb, the Australian ‘Airbnb for Parking’ launches in Kenya

Kerb, the Australian ‘Airbnb for Parking’ launches in Kenya

Business, Mobile, social media, Startups
Kerb, the Australian ‘Airbnb for Parking’ has launched in Kenya to allow car users find parking easily as well as let homeowners rent out their spare spaces to make extra cash. Launched in Australia in October 2016 by Rob Brown and Matt Salmon , Kerb is live across the world in 19 languages and localized in 300 cities. The Kenya launch will be shortly followed by a regional expansion across East Africa. “We’re really excited about the benefits that Kerb is going to have for users”, says Co-founder Rob Brown. “The app allows you to list an entire car park up in minutes, and each individual bay can be customised by availability, price and vehicle type.” Kerb changes the conventional view about where people can park their cars, motorbikes, boats and even helicopters! Kerb