Technology

SEACOM subsea cable to undergo restoration after experiencing a service-affecting outage

SEACOM subsea cable to undergo restoration after experiencing a service-affecting outage

Internet, Technology
SEACOM has been experiencing a service-affecting outage on the SEACOM Subsea Cable System. The marine fault is located slightly west of Djibouti in the Red Sea and occurred on the 8th April 19:00 GMT. As a result, some Zuku Fiber customers have been experiencing internet service disruption when loading some internet sites. However, the submarine cable operator has been able to activate additional diverse capacity to its network today and as a result are starting to provide linear transmission customers with restoration capacity on a first come first serve basis. All customers whose service is being restored are being contacted directly to advise them of the status. According to SEACOM, the impact of the incident is that all linear transmission traffic on the east coast of Africa
Facebook is taking mind reading from sci-fi to reality

Facebook is taking mind reading from sci-fi to reality

social media, Technology
Facebook has unveiled a project from its secretive Building 8 research group that’s working to create a brain-computer interface that lets you type with your thoughts. The social media giant announced during day two of its F8 developer conference that its Building 8 hardware lab is working on technology that will one day allow users to type with your thoughts and hear through your skin. Our brains, along with the cochleas in our ears, possess the power to reconstruct language from components, and Facebook is looking at hardware and software to transmit those components to the body via pressure changes and vibrations. During the day 2 keynote, the company demonstrated a video of one of its engineers repeating words communicated to her through sensors embedded in a sleeve on her arm. Simpl
Google to unveil an ad-blocking feature for its Chrome browser

Google to unveil an ad-blocking feature for its Chrome browser

Technology
Google is reportedly planning to add an ad blocker to Chrome, its web browser, and to possibly turn it on by default for all users. That seems counterintuitive for a company that makes the majority of its revenue from advertising, but it could actually be a way to beat blockers by becoming one itself. The ad-blocker, which would be available as a default setting for both mobile and desktop, could spell the end of certain online adverts which many users claim disrupt their browsing experience. Targeted adverts are likely to be those featured in a report released last month by the Coalition for Better Ads, a U.S. and European industry group, the Journal suggests. These include six desktop and twelve mobile web ad experiences which it said fell below the threshold of "consumer acceptability...
Kenya’s Tech Hub headed to a whole new level

Kenya’s Tech Hub headed to a whole new level

Technology
Kenya’s “Silicon Savannah” technology hub is retooling to put income before activism with a homegrown African tech community rising in this city. Several bootstrapped but profitable businesses are starting up using technology and the Internet to solve commercial problems connecting the biggest names in technology and finance. Last month, Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google started a strategic alliance with the iHub, an incubator and co-working space at the heart of Kenya’s tech scene, to reach and train app developers there. The Silicon Valley companies will tap local talent for coding and product development; they also will train Kenyans in artificial intelligence, cloud computing and machine learning—reinforcing the region’s role as the center for technology in Africa. Kenya las
Africa looking to space to power its science, tech ambitions

Africa looking to space to power its science, tech ambitions

Technology
Ethiopia is the latest nation in Africa to look skyward and declare its ambitions in space. The country’s ministry of science and technology announced that it will launch a satellite into orbit in three to five years to better develop its weather-monitoring capabilities. This follows the 2015 launch of a privately-funded, multi-million dollar astronomical observatory in the Entoto hills overlooking Addis Ababa—the only one of its kind in the region. The bigger picture is a realization among African countries of the value space technology holds for economic development, job creation—and military aspirations. Many African nations lack the human expertise or capital to fund these projects. But for those that do, information gleaned from satellites has the potential to improve agriculture, g