Creating the African Bill Gates with Digital Innovation

Sub-Saharan Africa has a youthful population, with 70% of it under the age of 30. However, unemployment is high amongst the youth.

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The African nations believe that addressing the digital and economic challenges could be done through the strengthening of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education on the continent. This will help prepare the continent’s young generation for ‘future jobs,’ and to fully leverage opportunities presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

This will help prepare the continent’s young generation for ‘future jobs,’ and to fully leverage opportunities presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Several non-government organizations, governments, and companies are playing their part in making sure that the AU’s Agenda 2063, popularly known as ‘The Africa We Want,’ is realized by investing in STEM.

Several non-government organizations, governments, and companies are playing their part in making sure that the AU’s Agenda 2063, popularly known as ‘The Africa We Want,’ is realized by investing in STEM.

On top of the list is the African Girls STEM Camp. This program ran by the Nigeria-based Working to Advance STEM Education for African Women (WAAW) Foundation, to “Increase the pipeline of African women entering into science and technology fields and ensure they are engaged in technology innovation and entrepreneurship to benefit Africa.”

The program is aimed at attracting more African girls between the ages of 13 and 17 from poor economic backgrounds into STEM disciplines. The first of its kind was hosted in 2013 in Lagos, Nigeria, and has since become an annual event.

Additionally, a tech giant from the United States of America has teamed up with several partners, including United Nations Development Program, to equip 25-million people in Africa with IT skills over the next five years. At a cost of $70 million, the cloud-based learning platform aims to empower African citizens, entrepreneurs, and communities with the knowledge and tools to design, develop, and launch their own digital solutions.

Users who already have advanced IT skills will be able to explore career-oriented IT topics including programming, cyber security, data science, as well as important business skills like critical thinking, innovation, and entrepreneurship.

With this initiatives underway , the digital development of African nations is deemed to make a crucial steps towards getting the next Bill Gates from Africa.

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