Tag: cyber crime

57 million customer Uber data breach didn’t affect Africa

Startups, Technology
Taxi-hailing company Uber has told ITWeb Africa that a recently surfaced data breach, which the company experienced last year affecting 57 million customers and drivers, only affected the US. The company would not comment or disclose details of measures it is currently taking to ensure the integrity of its systems and security of drivers or riders in Africa. Bloomberg reported that Uber not only kept the security breach secret from the victims, but also paid the hackers US$100,000 to "delete the data [and] keep quiet." Bloomberg quotes Uber as follows: "Compromised data from the October 2016 attack included names, email addresses and phone numbers of 50 million Uber riders around the world...The personal information of about 7 million drivers was accessed as well, including some 6...
Companies ought to change their approach to IT security

Companies ought to change their approach to IT security

Cyber Security
Amidst rapidly changing technological realm, opportunities and challenges that the technology provides has become elusive. We are at a crossroads as we move from a society already snarled with the internet to the coming age of automation, Big Data, and the Internet of Things (IoT). But as the society operates largely on technology, it may have gone too far in technology dependence. While it brings greater benefits, by the very nature of the opportunities it presents it becomes a focal point for cybercrime, industrial espionage, and cyberattacks. The current digital business landscape sees many organisations face a myriad of evolving security threats. Based on experiences, companies today tend to spend 80% of their security budgets on trying to prevent security breaches, but only ...
Kenya worst hit in East Africa by cyber crime

Kenya worst hit in East Africa by cyber crime

Cyber Security
Cyber crime has been dubbed “burglary for the 21st Century”  around the globe. But the scale of the crimes which can now be committed means millions of finances can now be stolen at the touch of a button. In East Africa, Kenya recorded the highest losses, $171 million, to cyber criminals. Banks have become the leading target of cybercrime as people increasingly adopt the use of financial technology. According to Serianu’s Cybersecurity Report 2016, African countries lost at least $2 billion in cyberattacks in 2016. Tanzania lost $85 million while Ugandan companies lost $35 million. Over one-third of organisations that experienced a breach in 2016 reported substantial customer, opportunity and revenue loss of more than 20 percent, this according to Cisco 2017 Annual Cybersecurity Report.
Kenya ICT Ministry urging massive investment in cyber security

Kenya ICT Ministry urging massive investment in cyber security

Cyber Security
Amid calls for regional harmonisation of cyber-crime laws, the government of Kenya is proceeding with the passage of a bill to address the growing problem of cyber-crime. The Kenya government is set to pass the Computer and Cybercrime Bill into law after its approval by cabinet as east African countries push for regional harmonization of cyber-crime laws. The bill is set to be tabled in parliament for debate and then go to a vote within the next few weeks. After that, it is expected to be signed by the president before the end of the year. According to the Kenya's ICT cabinet secretary, the Computer and Cybercrime Bill 2016 will target illegal access, online fraud, money laundering, phishing, cyber-stalking and child abuse, among other things. Cyber-criminals can only be guarded again...
Hackers Can Steal Your Passwords by Monitoring SmartPhone Sensors

Hackers Can Steal Your Passwords by Monitoring SmartPhone Sensors

Cyber Security, Mobile
An average smartphone these days is packed with a wide array of sensors such as GPS, Camera, microphone, accelerometer, magnetometer, proximity, gyroscope, pedometer, and NFC. According to a team of UK scientists , hackers can potentially guess PINs and passwords – that you enter either on a bank website, app, your lock screen – to a surprising degree of accuracy by monitoring your phone's sensors, like the angle and motion of your phone while you are typing. The danger comes due to the way malicious websites and apps access most of a smartphone's internal sensors without requesting any permission to access them – doesn't matter even if you are accessing a secure website over HTTPS to enter your password.  Smartphone apps usually ask your permissions to grant them access to sensors lik