Tag: internet

Opera Report: African women use mobile internet more heavily than men

Opera Report: African women use mobile internet more heavily than men

Internet
A study undertaken by global software company Opera and digital reading non-profit Worldreader revealed that women in these three African countries are as tech savvy as men when it comes to browsing the internet using their mobile phones. Women are using their browsers as often as men, with the majority of female survey respondents in Kenya and Nigeria (60%) stating that they access their mobile browsers more than eight times a day to do various internet activities. Opera ran a survey of 1,500 women and men aged 14 to 44 in Nigeria, Kenya, and South Africa in May 2017 to learn more about their web browsing habits on their mobile phones. The poll results were later combined with Worldreader insights on the mobile reading habits of 50,000 Worldreader app users in the three countries ab...
How the growth of free Wi-Fi is transforming life in Africa

How the growth of free Wi-Fi is transforming life in Africa

Internet
In Africa, a new ICT trend is curved towards providing citizens with free Wi-Fi in order to boost economic activity and education, in line with McKinsey’s projection that if internet penetration grows in the same way as that of mobile phones on the continent, it could contribute as much as 10 per cent – $300 billion – of the continent’s total GDP by 2025. The provision of free Wi-Fi is becoming a continent-wide trend. In Kenya, the county of Nakuru is offering residents free access through a partnership between the State House Digital Team and the county government, at the reported cost of US$2 million. Rwanda’s Smart Kigali initiative provides designated free Wi-Fi hotspots around the capital. The Murtala Muhammad Airport Two (MMA2) in Lagos provides free access for passengers throu
The biggest game changer in African development is the internet

The biggest game changer in African development is the internet

Uncategorized
Information and communication technology is driving the new “knowledge-based” economy in the developed and developing world. However, internet access remains comparatively low in Africa, with internet penetration at 20% for the continent. There’s free Facebook, mobile banking, and the promise of cashless societies and digitised land records. And from Accra in the west to Kigali in the east, a spray of “tech hubs” talk about “leapfrogging” technology and incubating start-ups. Such are the giddy promises of Africa’s “fourth industrial revolution” – a giant step forward into the digital world which the Guardian is reporting on for the next two weeks. Some are salivating that it will amount to the renaissance of a marginalised continent, while others soberly warn of the hype. By 2
An ad-supported internet isn’t going to be sustainable in emerging markets

An ad-supported internet isn’t going to be sustainable in emerging markets

Internet
Since the Internet’s earliest days, advertising has been the linchpin of the digital economy, supporting businesses from online journalism to social networking. Indeed Facebook and Google earn almost all of their revenue through digital advertising. As the Internet reaches new users in emerging economies like Nigeria, Kenya and Rwanda, this model is following close behind. But is the digital advertising model that has evolved in developed economies sustainable in emerging economies? And if it’s not: What does it mean for the billions of users who are counting on the Internet to unlock new pathways to education, economic growth, and innovation? Increasingly, research and practice show the ad-supported internet of developed economies isn’t sustainable in regions like Sub-Saharan Africa, S
Does Lack of local content hinder Internet Adoption?

Does Lack of local content hinder Internet Adoption?

Internet
Sub-Saharan Africa has seen great improvements in connectivity infrastructure, with increasing investment in access infrastructure including mobile internet networks and fibre backbones. While this is a step in the right direction, the adoption of technologies such as 3G and 4G is lagging behind, raising the question of why it's taking so long for Africa to get online. Although agriculture and natural resources which have proved workable in Africa will continue to be important drivers of Africa’s economic growth in 2011, it is the application of modern technologies that will have the most significant impact on the growth trajectories of most African economies. Specifically, the greatest opportunity for growth is deemed come from technological innovation and the adoption of new technologi