Tag: kenya

Safaricom Sets Up Kenya’s First Telecommunications Lab

Safaricom Sets Up Kenya’s First Telecommunications Lab

Mobile, Technology
Safaricom , Kenya's largest mobile service provider has launched the country’s first ever telecommunications lab for fast tracking the deployment of new technology and solutions. Located at the firm’s headquarters in Nairobi, the lab replicates Safaricom’s entire networking – billing platform and application servers such as M-PESA, 4G networks, Safaricom’s cloud, microwave, etc in a single room. The Telecomm firm has collaborated with a number of industry players including Cisco, Huawei, Nokia and others who have donated equipment and expertise to the lab, which is located at the firm's headquarters in Nairobi. Safaricom's more than 27 million customers will benefit from this investment, which will see fast tracking of deployment of new technology and solutions. Previously, the inh
Struggling Kenyan Uber drivers in fear of rising taxi competition

Struggling Kenyan Uber drivers in fear of rising taxi competition

Technology
Uber Kenya, already one of the company’s most affordable services in the world, charges a minimum fare of $2.90. The company announced in April  that it will be introducing an even cheaper service at half that price, $1.45, by allowing its drivers to use much older, lower-quality cars. The San francisco based company has quickly expanded across parts of Africa, where it is seen by those signing up as drivers — or “partners” in the Uber lingo — as a rare job opportunity on a continent with stubbornly high levels of unemployment. But the service has stirred debate over how low fares should go, and the company has faced a series of strikes from South Africa to Lagos. This month, drivers in Lagos, Nigeria’s biggest city, went on strike after fares were slashed by 40 percent. Faced with
Safaricom goes digital with the launch of M-pesa smart card

Safaricom goes digital with the launch of M-pesa smart card

Technology
Kenya’s largest mobile service provider, Safaricom, has launched the much anticipated M-Pesa payment cards which was unveiled during the announcement of the Safaricom FY Results, 2017. The Safaricom smart card looks more like the Debit and Visa Cards but the functionalities are not the same . The card allows  for payment of services and goods instantly. Dubbed M-Pesa 1 Tap, this payment solution package includes a Wrist band and NFC badge. First launched successfully as a Pilot in Nakuru, M-Pesa 1 Tap will be rolling out country-wide with about 500,000 point of sale (POS) payment points in bars and restaurants, retail shops, fuel stations, among others. This is going to change everything. The M-PESA Card is linked to a user's M-PESA account. Therefore, before using the M-PESA Card
Affordable internet remains elusive in Kenya

Affordable internet remains elusive in Kenya

Internet, Technology
In 2017, the world will mark a significant milestone: 50% global internet penetration. Though internet access has become a daily expectation for many, its hardly available. Today, over four billion people — some 56% of the world — are still not using the Internet.   The majority of this offline population are women. Most live in LDCs and other developing countries. One of the key obstacles countries face in the race to expand access is affordability — the vast majority of those without Internet access today are offline simply because they cannot afford a basic connection. The arrival of SEACOM marine fibre optic cable on the Kenyan coast in 2009 excited Internet users - who were promised reliable and faster service. The optimism was that country’s connection to the outside world vi
An African Silicon Valley? Pitfalls and Promise on Kenya’s Silicon Savannah

An African Silicon Valley? Pitfalls and Promise on Kenya’s Silicon Savannah

Technology
Kenya’s Silicon Savannah is the darling of development agencies and one of the prime go-to examples for business and entrepreneurs around the globe. In Kenya’s Silicon Savannah one can pick and choose cases that demonstrate just how countries can leapfrog technological stages and catapult themselves into the ranks of techie superpower stardom. Yet are the glitz and accolades really in order? And do Kenya’s efforts to reproduce a Kenyan Silicon Valley on the savannah by building tech cities and innovation hubs stand a chance of succeeding? Or are they simply white elephant projects of venture capitalists and government development agencies? To answer these questions this article takes a comparative approach and explores the building blocks of California’s Silicon Valley. It also identif