Tag: Security

Companies ought to change their approach to IT security

Companies ought to change their approach to IT security

Cyber Security
Amidst rapidly changing technological realm, opportunities and challenges that the technology provides has become elusive. We are at a crossroads as we move from a society already snarled with the internet to the coming age of automation, Big Data, and the Internet of Things (IoT). But as the society operates largely on technology, it may have gone too far in technology dependence. While it brings greater benefits, by the very nature of the opportunities it presents it becomes a focal point for cybercrime, industrial espionage, and cyberattacks. The current digital business landscape sees many organisations face a myriad of evolving security threats. Based on experiences, companies today tend to spend 80% of their security budgets on trying to prevent security breaches, but only ...
In a bid to secure the whole world, Kaspersky Lab launches its free antivirus

In a bid to secure the whole world, Kaspersky Lab launches its free antivirus

Cyber Security
Kaspersky lab, a Russian security firm, is offering up free anti-virus protection globally after a year-and-a-half of testing it in select regions.  The free antivirus doesn't have VPN, Parental Controls and Online Payment Protection its paid counterpart offers, but it has all the essential features you need to protect your PC. It can scan files and emails, protect your PC while you use the web and quarantine malware that infects your system. In return, Kaspersky lab will use data users contribute to improve machine learning across its products. In a blog post authored by the security firm's chief, Eugene Kaspersky explains that an increase in the number of installations of Kaspersky Free is expected to positively affect the quality of protection of all users, since the "big-data

Microsoft warns of Internet Explorer Security flaw that put users at risk, exposes Windows XP

Cyber Security, Internet
BBC News: Microsoft has warned consumers that a vulnerability in its Internet Explorer browser could let hackers gain access and user rights to their computer. The flaw affects Internet Explorer (IE) versions 6 to 11 and Microsoft said it was aware of "limited, targeted attacks" to exploit it. According to NetMarket Share, the IE versions account for more than 50% of global browser market. Microsoft says it is investigating the flaw and will take "appropriate" steps. The firm, which issued a security advisory over the weekend, said the steps "may include providing a solution through our monthly security update release process, or an out-of-cycle security update, depending on customer needs". “Start Quote If the current user is logged on with administrative user rights, an att

Hackers text ATMs for cash using Windows XP flaws

Business, Cyber Security
Summary: With the end of Windows XP support looming, ATMs worldwide are left vulnerable -- and cyberattackers are taking advantage of the fact. Despite early warnings, pleading and even financial lures to upgrade systems from the Windows XP operating system, many of our core services are still running on the soon to be retired system. It's not just our grandparents that stick stubbornly to Windows XP, which is due for an end-of-life and support retirement on April 8 this year. According to Symantec researchers, the banking industry is likely to be affected on this date, as 95 percent of our ATMs -- computer systems that control access to funds -- are still running on the archaic system. Microsoft has already warned users that they risk "zero day forever" scenarios if they fail to ...

WhatsApp Messages May Not Actually Be Private or Secure

Cyber Security
NEW DELHI: If you use WhatsApp on an Android phone, you should be careful about what you talk about or share on the instant messaging app. Using a few scripts and a rogue app, anyone can peer into your chat logs and see what you talk about with your friends. A Dutch security consultant has found that WhatsApp chat logs saved on the SD card of an Android phone can be read by other apps because of the way Android allows sharing of data between apps. "The WhatsApp database is saved on the SD card which can be read by any Android application if the user allows it to access the SD card. And since majority of the people allows everything on their Android device, this is not much of a problem," Bas Bosschert wrote on his blog. "What do we need to steal someone's WhatsApp database? First ...